This Week on Livestream | March 13, 2017

Watch live as The New School streams from SXSW, punk legend Legs McNeil speaks at McNally Jackson Books, and the National Institute of Aerospace hosts a seminar series.


A Poem For Peter: The story of Ezra Jack Keats and the creation of The Snowy Day | 92nd Street Y
Monday, March 13
10:30 AM ET
“Join award-winning children’s book author Andrea Davis Pinkney for a reading of A Poem For Peter. Ms. Pinkneys’ lyrical narrative tells the inspiring story of a boy who pursued a dream, and who, in turn, inspired generations of other dreamers.”

The New Archive: How Tech Democratizes Historical Narratives | The New School
Monday, March 13
5:30 PM ET
“New School Professor Lauren Walsh and VII Agency photojournalist Ron Haviv talk about Lost Rolls America (LRA), a public photo archive that emphasizes a democratic process and prioritizes the role of photography in memory and history. This open discussion offers a broad meditation on how imagery impacts the recollection and narration of the past and how our relationship to images and memories has evolved.”

Please Kill Me: Legs McNeil & Gillian McCain | McNally Jackson Live
Monday, March 13
7 PM ET
“For the 20th anniversary of Please Kill Me, the now canonical oral history of New York punk, McNally Jackson welcomes authors Legs McNeil, the original New York punk himself, and Gillian McCain. The book follows The New York Dolls, The Ramones, and other legends through their travails at CBGB’s and across the Lower East Side.”

Robert Lepage with Paul Holdengräber: Theater of Memory | LIVE from the NYPL
Tuesday, March 14
7 PM ET
“Iconic playwright and director Robert Lepage returns to BAM in 2017 to stage his 10th production there. 887 Murray Avenue, Quebec City, Canada, named after the apartment complex where Lepage spent his youth, comes to life as a bewitching, tech-saturated dollhouse in this deeply personal solo work. Lepage comes to the New York Public Library to discuss the play and his experience unearthing a life’s worth of memories.”

HU Center for Atmospheric Research and Education Seminar Series | National Institute of Aerospace
Wednesday, March 15
“The overarching goal of CARE is to create a series of connected research opportunities that will take under-represented students from high school and undergraduate internships to graduate research and finally to employment opportunities at agencies such as NASA.”

MIT Excellence Awards Webcast | MIT
Thursday, March 16
3 PM ET
“The MIT Excellence Awards acknowledge the extraordinary efforts made by members of the community toward fulfilling the goals, values, and mission of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.”

The Photograph Not Taken- a Talk with Amy Arbus | B&H
Thursday, March 16
4 PM ET
“Amy will show the photographs she treasures most; both her own and those of her mentors. She will reveal their relationships, both their similarities and differences. Her theory is that shedding light on her instincts, thought process, and technique will help you to uncover the secrets of your own. After all, we share a common desire: to make the photograph not yet taken.”

Cheech Marin | Cheech Is Not My Real Name: …But Don’t Call Me Chong | Author Events
Thursday, March 16
7:30 PM ET
“In addition to the reams of Cheech and Chong comedy albums and films he and his partner wrote and starred in, Cheech Marin, half of the eponymous Grammy-winning stoner comedy duo, has dozens of other film and television roles under his belt, including a starring role on the show Nash Bridges and voice credits in a slew of Disney animated films. His long-awaited memoir delves not only into his legendary entertainment career, but also how he dodged the draft, acquired an expansive collection of Chicano art, and became a self-made icon.”

2017 ACA: Martial Arts | My Sport Live
Saturday, March 18
7 PM ET
“A range of Martial Arts will be on display at the world’s largest annual multi-sport festival. An initiative of Arnold Schwarzenegger, the Arnold Classic Australia Multi-Sport Festival features live sports, health and fitness workshops and activities, and sports stars.”

2017 ACA: ProRaw Powerlifting | My Sport Live
Saturday, March 18
7 PM ET
“Men’s 125kg and 125kg+ classes will be on display at the Arnold Classic Australia Multi-Sport Festival.”

5 Tips for Streaming Live Interviews

Bringing a guest speaker onto your live show is a great way to add insight and expertise to your regular programming. With new solutions arriving on the market every day, streaming live interviews is more popular than ever. Gone are the days of pricey flights and complicated scheduling. Now anyone can invite a guest to join their live broadcast, from wherever they are.

Getting Started Streaming Live Interviews

Streaming live interviews can be intimidating, but you don’t have to be Terry Gross to conduct a great live interview. With our tools and tips, you can get started streaming live interviews right away.

1. Finding a Remote Interview Solution

The most important things to consider when choosing a remote interview solution are reliability, video/audio quality, and ease of use. Video conferencing software is a popular choice for beginners, but it isn’t always ideal for a live broadcast. A dedicated live interview solution is the right tool for the job.

Many streaming solutions, like Livestream Studio software, include a live interview function. Adding a live interview in Livestream Studio is very simple: if your guest has a webcam and the Google Chrome browser, you can send them a unique URL generated by the Studio software. When they open the URL, it will automatically activate their camera and send a signal to your Studio software, giving you both the ability to chat in real time.

2. Testing Your Workflow

Before you go live for the first time, test your live interview workflow. Ask your guest if they can join you for a remote “rehearsal” so you can troubleshoot ahead of your broadcast. During your rehearsal, make sure to test your camera and audio equipment, your streaming encoder, and – most importantly – your internet connection.

This last component is especially important. Both you and your interview subject should connect to a dedicated network if available. Connecting via ethernet, instead of WiFi, adds much-needed stability to your live broadcast. Without a reliable network connection, your live interview could have stuttering, buffering, and drop-outs, making it hard to have a smooth conversation.

3. Practice Makes Perfect

Your first live interview might have a few hiccups, but that’s to be expected. Try running a test stream, and monitoring it online, so you can better understand what your audience will see. After testing your workflow, try practicing your interview techniques with a friend or colleague. If you have questions for your interview subject, run through them so they seem second-nature on the day of your show. With enough practice, you’ll feel confident about having a conversation on camera with your guest.

4. Looking Good, Feeling Great

With live video, you only get one chance to make a first impression. When you’re streaming live interviews, it’s important to put your best foot (or face) forward.

Before you start streaming, take the time to bring your space to life. You don’t need to rig heavy lights or contend with cumbersome equipment. Even adding a few simple LED lights will make your video softer and more evenly lit.

If your guest doesn’t have access to a dedicated space, ask them to find a well-lit, well-appointed location to conduct their interview. If additional lighting isn’t an option, recommend a place with soft, indirect lighting (think table lamps). Overhead lighting, especially the fluorescent kind, can make you and your subject look wan and high-contrast.

5. Creating a Distribution Strategy

You’ve just wrapped up a great interview, but what happens next? It’s time to start thinking about your distribution strategy. It’s important to continue the conversation with your viewers so you can promote your next live show, and encourage your audience to tune in next time.

With your Livestream account, you can easily maintain an archive of your live shows. You can share the video on-demand of your live event on all of your social channels. Each video on-demand comes with its own unique embed code so you can post the interview to your – and your guest’s – website. You can also download the video itself and edit your show into bite-sized pieces of content.

If your interview guest has a following of their own, ask them to share your video on-demand to their fans and followers. Livestream uses this strategy with our webinar series, Livestream Learn. After the show ends, we write a blog post around the event, with a call-to-action to watch the full show in each post.

Ready for Your Close-Up

These five tips for streaming live interviews are just the beginning. As you continue to grow and learn, your live video strategy will evolve too. Remember to set aside time before and after your live broadcast to test your equipment, rehearse your show, and stay in touch with your audience. You’ll master the art of the interview in no time!

Want to learn more about getting started with streaming live interviews?

Check out our webinar with CXOTALK founder Michael Krigsman to learn how one independent uses Livestream to interview leading entrepreneurs in technology and business.