5 Tips for Streaming Live Interviews

Bringing a guest speaker onto your live show is a great way to add insight and expertise to your regular programming. With new solutions arriving on the market every day, streaming live interviews is more popular than ever. Gone are the days of pricey flights and complicated scheduling. Now anyone can invite a guest to join their live broadcast, from wherever they are.

Getting Started Streaming Live Interviews

Streaming live interviews can be intimidating, but you don’t have to be Terry Gross to conduct a great live interview. With our tools and tips, you can get started streaming live interviews right away.

1. Finding a Remote Interview Solution

The most important things to consider when choosing a remote interview solution are reliability, video/audio quality, and ease of use. Video conferencing software is a popular choice for beginners, but it isn’t always ideal for a live broadcast. A dedicated live interview solution is the right tool for the job.

Many streaming solutions, like Livestream Studio software, include a live interview function. Adding a live interview in Livestream Studio is very simple: if your guest has a webcam and the Google Chrome browser, you can send them a unique URL generated by the Studio software. When they open the URL, it will automatically activate their camera and send a signal to your Studio software, giving you both the ability to chat in real time.

2. Testing Your Workflow

Before you go live for the first time, test your live interview workflow. Ask your guest if they can join you for a remote “rehearsal” so you can troubleshoot ahead of your broadcast. During your rehearsal, make sure to test your camera and audio equipment, your streaming encoder, and – most importantly – your internet connection.

This last component is especially important. Both you and your interview subject should connect to a dedicated network if available. Connecting via ethernet, instead of WiFi, adds much-needed stability to your live broadcast. Without a reliable network connection, your live interview could have stuttering, buffering, and drop-outs, making it hard to have a smooth conversation.

3. Practice Makes Perfect

Your first live interview might have a few hiccups, but that’s to be expected. Try running a test stream, and monitoring it online, so you can better understand what your audience will see. After testing your workflow, try practicing your interview techniques with a friend or colleague. If you have questions for your interview subject, run through them so they seem second-nature on the day of your show. With enough practice, you’ll feel confident about having a conversation on camera with your guest.

4. Looking Good, Feeling Great

With live video, you only get one chance to make a first impression. When you’re streaming live interviews, it’s important to put your best foot (or face) forward.

Before you start streaming, take the time to bring your space to life. You don’t need to rig heavy lights or contend with cumbersome equipment. Even adding a few simple LED lights will make your video softer and more evenly lit.

If your guest doesn’t have access to a dedicated space, ask them to find a well-lit, well-appointed location to conduct their interview. If additional lighting isn’t an option, recommend a place with soft, indirect lighting (think table lamps). Overhead lighting, especially the fluorescent kind, can make you and your subject look wan and high-contrast.

5. Creating a Distribution Strategy

You’ve just wrapped up a great interview, but what happens next? It’s time to start thinking about your distribution strategy. It’s important to continue the conversation with your viewers so you can promote your next live show, and encourage your audience to tune in next time.

With your Livestream account, you can easily maintain an archive of your live shows. You can share the video on-demand of your live event on all of your social channels. Each video on-demand comes with its own unique embed code so you can post the interview to your – and your guest’s – website. You can also download the video itself and edit your show into bite-sized pieces of content.

If your interview guest has a following of their own, ask them to share your video on-demand to their fans and followers. Livestream uses this strategy with our webinar series, Livestream Learn. After the show ends, we write a blog post around the event, with a call-to-action to watch the full show in each post.

Ready for Your Close-Up

These five tips for streaming live interviews are just the beginning. As you continue to grow and learn, your live video strategy will evolve too. Remember to set aside time before and after your live broadcast to test your equipment, rehearse your show, and stay in touch with your audience. You’ll master the art of the interview in no time!

Want to learn more about getting started with streaming live interviews?

Check out our webinar with CXOTALK founder Michael Krigsman to learn how one independent uses Livestream to interview leading entrepreneurs in technology and business.

This Week on Livestream | October 16, 2017

Watch live as singer, songwriter, and activist Billy Bragg honors Woodie Guthrie, Gabrielle Union stops at the Free Library of Philadelphia, and the Boston Conservatory at Berklee raises money for Puerto Rico.


Courtney Barnett + Kurt Vile (Sea Lice By The Seaside) | Pitchfork Live
Monday, October 16
2 PM ET
“Philly country-psych zen master Kurt Vile and Australian indie-rock orator Courtney Barnett are at once an odd couple and a perfect union—not so much a mirror image of one another as a negative exposure.”

Amy Tan | Where the Past Begins: A Writer’s Memoir | Author Event
Tuesday, October 17
7:30 PM ET
Where the Past Begins is a memoir of Amy Tan’s life, art, and deeply personal inspirations that frame her fiction.”

Remembering Woody: An Evening with Billy Dragg and Friends | The Greene Space
Tuesday, October 17
7:30 PM ET
“Join singer, songwriter and activist Billy Bragg and special guests for an evening commemorating the 50th anniversary of folk music icon Woody Guthrie’s death.”

Gabrielle Union’s Real Life Book Club Tour | Author Events
Thursday, October 19
7:30 PM ET
“Gabrielle Union’s new book, We’re Going to Need More Wine, is an intimate, urgent collection of essays about race, bullying, competition between women in Hollywood, and her own trauma as a victim of sexual assault.”

40 Years of Cosmic Discovery: Celebrating the Voyager Missions and Humanity’s Message to Space | Cornell Alumni
Thursday, October 19
8 PM ET
“Only one human-touched object has ever entered interstellar space: NASA’s Voyager 1, bearing with it greetings to extraterrestrials in the form of a Golden Record. Cornell will celebrate the 40th anniversary of Voyagers 1 and 2 and the university’s central role in the missions.”

Vitaly Bulgarov Live & Uncut: Designing for Films, Games & Real-World Robotic | Gnomon
Friday, October 20
10 PM ET
“Join Gnomon School of VFX to learn about the career path of Vitaly Bulgarov, hear his personal insights, and get meaningful answers to your very own questions.”

Boston for Puerto Rico | Boston Conservatory at Berklee
Saturday, October 21
1 PM ET
“Students from all departments of The Boston Conservatory at Berklee will be performing in a benefit concert to raise money for hurricane Maria relief in Puerto Rico. All proceeds will be donated to Unidos por Puerto Rico.”

Sexual Assault Crisis Center | Shall We Dance 2017
Saturday, October 21
8 PM ET
“Shall We Dance is an uplifting and entertaining event that increases awareness about sexual assault while helping the Sexual Assault Crisis Center.”

Harold in Italy | Detroit Symphony Orchestra
Saturday, October 21
8 PM ET
“On a program with DSO Principal musicians as featured soloists, Eric Nowlin performs the music depicting the melancholy traveler Harold, and Wei Yu returns as a soloist for Elgar’s Cello Concerto.”