Livestream Learn Recap: How to Measure Live Video Success Across Channels

Streaming your events and marketing content live is a great way to connect with your audiences. Even better? Streaming to Facebook, YouTube, or other platforms at the same time to increase your reach. But how do you measure the success of your live video across channels?

This week on Livestream Learn, Product Manager Matt Newberg demonstrated how to compare analytics across multiple social channels. We opened our show with a brief refresher on how to stream to multiple social channels with Livestream. Read the recap from our earlier show to learn how to stream to multiple social channels.

Streaming to multiple social channels is a great way to grow your audience and improve your live video strategy. According to Facebook’s own research, audiences watch Facebook Live videos three times longer than regular video posts. Research from industry leader Hubspot tells us that “48% of marketers plan to add YouTube to their content strategy in the next year.” Simulcast from Livestream makes it easy for you to stream to Facebook Live, YouTube Live, and other social channels from a single source.

Tracking Livestream Analytics Across Social Channels

Tracking your data across multiple destinations can feel like a scavenger hunt. But with our Analytics dashboard, you can gather real viewership metrics from your other streaming platforms in a single location.

Livestream Analytics offers viewership numbers, average watch time, and geographical location on an event-by-event basis. Comparing your viewers on one platform or another is easy with our dashboard, which provides a bird’s-eye view of your content across channels.

Measuring Streaming Success

Streaming to multiple social destinations is a great way to reach your audience where they already are. Once you know your metrics, how do you decide if your event was “successful”?

Two indicators of success are “viewership” and “average watch time,” which are measured differently depending on the platform. Facebook Live counts a view as “three seconds or longer,” so if anyone watching your Facebook Live stream for longer than three seconds is considered a “viewer.” On YouTube, which is a dedicated video platform, that number jumps to 30 seconds or longer. The longer the average watch time, the better. We strive for five to ten minutes at Livestream Learn.

Livestream makes it easy for you to grow your audience while streaming to your viewers’ favorite destinations. Tools like our chat feature or lead capture forms let you engage your audience or learn more about them during your stream. With our live player embed, you can direct viewers from your social streams back to your own website.

Now that you know how to stream to multiple destinations and how to interpret your analytics, consider these tips for success before you go live:

  • Streaming for 20 minutes or longer gives viewers more opportunity to engage with your content.
  • Scheduling broadcasts on Facebook and YouTube automatically notifies your followers when you go live.
  • Promoting your event on other channels, or a targeted email campaign, reminds your viewers to tune in and watch.

Thanks for watching! If you missed our live show, you can watch the full video below:

9 Need-to-Know Stats About Livestreaming for Broadcasters [Infographic]

Cord-cutting is on the rise. Audiences are pivoting away from traditional media toward new social and over-the-top content platforms like Netflix and Hulu. Livestreaming television and radio broadcast programming is the best way to reach your viewers across multiple platforms. Our research shows livestreaming for broadcasters is crucial for any modern media distribution strategy.

News and sports broadcasters are leading the charge, with new streaming portals eating away at traditional media’s market share. To meet viewer demand, broadcasters need to diversify the way they distribute their content.

“Not only have we realized an entirely new revenue stream, but [the livestream] has become so popular, we can’t imagine doing the radio show without the streaming video component.” – Shane French, Rover’s Morning Glory Radio Show

1. In 30 days, more video content is uploaded than all three major U.S. TV networks combined have created in 30 years.
2. Digital video consumption among adults has increased: from 21 minutes in 2011 to one hour and 16 minutes in 2015. (Source: eMarketer)
3. 78% of people watch videos online every week, and 55% of watch every day. (Source: Hubspot)
4. Users are spending an average of one hour and fifty-five minutes with digital video each day. (Source: eMarketer)
5. Millennials aged 14 to 25 are the only age group watching more shows on digital devices than on traditional TV screens. (Source: eMarketer)
6. 41% of digital audiences would watch livestreaming breaking news stories. (Source: GlobalWebIndex)
7. Digital radio engagement is up from 53 seconds in 2011 to over one minute in 2015. (Source: eMarketer)
8. In 2014, 47% of all Americans — an estimated 124M people — said they have listened to online radio in the last month. (Source: Media Daily News)
9. 75% of respondents who listen to online radio on a weekly basis think commercials are a fair trade for free programming. (Source: Media Daily News)


Want to learn more about how traditional media companies are growing their audiences with live video?

Read our case study with New York Magazine and Veuve Clicquot to learn:

  • How New York Magazine and Veuve Clicquot grew an in-person event into a widespread social phenomenon.
  • How live video can add dynamism and production value to publishers’ brand partnerships.
  • How livestreaming for publishers is changing the way readers engage with their favorite periodicals.

Download the Case Study