9 Need-to-Know Stats About Livestreaming for Broadcasters [Infographic]

Cord-cutting is on the rise. Audiences are pivoting away from traditional media toward new social and over-the-top content platforms like Netflix and Hulu. Livestreaming television and radio broadcast programming is the best way to reach your viewers across multiple platforms. Our research shows livestreaming for broadcasters is crucial for any modern media distribution strategy.

News and sports broadcasters are leading the charge, with new streaming portals eating away at traditional media’s market share. To meet viewer demand, broadcasters need to diversify the way they distribute their content.

“Not only have we realized an entirely new revenue stream, but [the livestream] has become so popular, we can’t imagine doing the radio show without the streaming video component.” – Shane French, Rover’s Morning Glory Radio Show

1. In 30 days, more video content is uploaded than all three major U.S. TV networks combined have created in 30 years.
2. Digital video consumption among adults has increased: from 21 minutes in 2011 to one hour and 16 minutes in 2015. (Source: eMarketer)
3. 78% of people watch videos online every week, and 55% of watch every day. (Source: Hubspot)
4. Users are spending an average of one hour and fifty-five minutes with digital video each day. (Source: eMarketer)
5. Millennials aged 14 to 25 are the only age group watching more shows on digital devices than on traditional TV screens. (Source: eMarketer)
6. 41% of digital audiences would watch livestreaming breaking news stories. (Source: GlobalWebIndex)
7. Digital radio engagement is up from 53 seconds in 2011 to over one minute in 2015. (Source: eMarketer)
8. In 2014, 47% of all Americans — an estimated 124M people — said they have listened to online radio in the last month. (Source: Media Daily News)
9. 75% of respondents who listen to online radio on a weekly basis think commercials are a fair trade for free programming. (Source: Media Daily News)


Want to learn more about how traditional media companies are growing their audiences with live video?

Read our case study with New York Magazine and Veuve Clicquot to learn:

  • How New York Magazine and Veuve Clicquot grew an in-person event into a widespread social phenomenon.
  • How live video can add dynamism and production value to publishers’ brand partnerships.
  • How livestreaming for publishers is changing the way readers engage with their favorite periodicals.

Download the Case Study

5 Tips for Streaming Live Interviews

Bringing a guest speaker onto your live show is a great way to add insight and expertise to your regular programming. With new solutions arriving on the market every day, streaming live interviews is more popular than ever. Gone are the days of pricey flights and complicated scheduling. Now anyone can invite a guest to join their live broadcast, from wherever they are.

Getting Started Streaming Live Interviews

Streaming live interviews can be intimidating, but you don’t have to be Terry Gross to conduct a great live interview. With our tools and tips, you can get started streaming live interviews right away.

1. Finding a Remote Interview Solution

The most important things to consider when choosing a remote interview solution are reliability, video/audio quality, and ease of use. Video conferencing software is a popular choice for beginners, but it isn’t always ideal for a live broadcast. A dedicated live interview solution is the right tool for the job.

Many streaming solutions, like Livestream Studio software, include a live interview function. Adding a live interview in Livestream Studio is very simple: if your guest has a webcam and the Google Chrome browser, you can send them a unique URL generated by the Studio software. When they open the URL, it will automatically activate their camera and send a signal to your Studio software, giving you both the ability to chat in real time.

2. Testing Your Workflow

Before you go live for the first time, test your live interview workflow. Ask your guest if they can join you for a remote “rehearsal” so you can troubleshoot ahead of your broadcast. During your rehearsal, make sure to test your camera and audio equipment, your streaming encoder, and – most importantly – your internet connection.

This last component is especially important. Both you and your interview subject should connect to a dedicated network if available. Connecting via ethernet, instead of WiFi, adds much-needed stability to your live broadcast. Without a reliable network connection, your live interview could have stuttering, buffering, and drop-outs, making it hard to have a smooth conversation.

3. Practice Makes Perfect

Your first live interview might have a few hiccups, but that’s to be expected. Try running a test stream, and monitoring it online, so you can better understand what your audience will see. After testing your workflow, try practicing your interview techniques with a friend or colleague. If you have questions for your interview subject, run through them so they seem second-nature on the day of your show. With enough practice, you’ll feel confident about having a conversation on camera with your guest.

4. Looking Good, Feeling Great

With live video, you only get one chance to make a first impression. When you’re streaming live interviews, it’s important to put your best foot (or face) forward.

Before you start streaming, take the time to bring your space to life. You don’t need to rig heavy lights or contend with cumbersome equipment. Even adding a few simple LED lights will make your video softer and more evenly lit.

If your guest doesn’t have access to a dedicated space, ask them to find a well-lit, well-appointed location to conduct their interview. If additional lighting isn’t an option, recommend a place with soft, indirect lighting (think table lamps). Overhead lighting, especially the fluorescent kind, can make you and your subject look wan and high-contrast.

5. Creating a Distribution Strategy

You’ve just wrapped up a great interview, but what happens next? It’s time to start thinking about your distribution strategy. It’s important to continue the conversation with your viewers so you can promote your next live show, and encourage your audience to tune in next time.

With your Livestream account, you can easily maintain an archive of your live shows. You can share the video on-demand of your live event on all of your social channels. Each video on-demand comes with its own unique embed code so you can post the interview to your – and your guest’s – website. You can also download the video itself and edit your show into bite-sized pieces of content.

If your interview guest has a following of their own, ask them to share your video on-demand to their fans and followers. Livestream uses this strategy with our webinar series, Livestream Learn. After the show ends, we write a blog post around the event, with a call-to-action to watch the full show in each post.

Ready for Your Close-Up

These five tips for streaming live interviews are just the beginning. As you continue to grow and learn, your live video strategy will evolve too. Remember to set aside time before and after your live broadcast to test your equipment, rehearse your show, and stay in touch with your audience. You’ll master the art of the interview in no time!

Want to learn more about getting started with streaming live interviews?

Check out our webinar with CXOTALK founder Michael Krigsman to learn how one independent uses Livestream to interview leading entrepreneurs in technology and business.